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My son's friend was arrested and charged with a criminal offense. Even though he is still in high school he was taken to the adult jail and booked in as an adult. He is 17 and is a senior in high school. Why was he charged as an adult?
Many people mistakenly believe that if a person is under the age of 18 when they commit a crime that they will be treated as a juvenile. Any offense committed by someone 17 or older falls under the Texas Penal Code and not the Texas Family Code which governs juveniles. Parents and teenagers need to be aware of the consequences teenagers may face is they engage is illegal activity.
My husband does not have a will and does not think that he needs one. We have two children under the age of 18 and we own some property. My husband was married before and has one child from that marriage who is an adult. Why should he leave a will?
By leaving a will your husband is ensuring that his property goes to the person or persons of his choice. He can also appoint a trustee for his minor children so that their needs are covered should something happen to both of you. If he were to die without a will the Texas Probate Code would determine who receives his property.
I was injured in a car wreck a few weeks ago and have been contacted by the other driver's insurance company. The adjustor wants me to sign papers and settle my claims for property damage and personal injury. They offered me some money, but I don't know if it is enough. What should I do?
Before you sign papers releasing the insurance company from liability in the accident, you should consult with an attorney who handles personal injury claims. Once you settle with the claim you will not be able to ever receive anymore money for your property damage or injuries. The adjuster for the insurance company is looking out for the insurance company's bottom line and is not there to advise you or to protect your rights. Get advice from an attorney who will review the case to be sure you are being compensated fairly.
How the amount of child support determined in Texas?
Child support in Texas is based upon the net monthly resources of the person (obligor) paying the support. Mandatory deductions including social security taxes, federal income taxes, union dues, and the cost of health insurance for the children in issue, are subtracted from the obligor's gross income to arrive at the net amount upon which support is based. The Texas Family Code's income guidelines are used to calculate the amount of support due. For example for 1 child, 20% of the net resources is due and for 2 children, 25% applies. Reduction of the percentage is available if the obligor has other biological or adopted children to support.
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Civil Law
Criminal Law
Family Law
Personal Injury
Wills and Probate

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